So Much Work for Just 60 Seconds

When you watch commercials, music videos, TV programs, or films, do you ever wonder who it is that handles the job of getting them on camera and how they’re put together? That’s the work of a video production company. There are really two kinds of companies that create video content. A technical production company may target details that the client isn’t interested in doing. They may do the things that come after the video is shot, the editing and the post-production. Or they may simply take the finished video and post it online. That’s one thing that a video production company may do.

Other companies are full-service. That means they do it all from start to finish, and post-production as well. A full-service company will do the creative development, then write the script. They’ll be responsible for locations and casting. They’ll produce, edit, and deliver the final product for posting. A company like this is totally hands-on; the client states what they want and the video professionals do the rest.

A commercial production company, as you may expect, has a specific focus. It creates short videos, 30 to 60 seconds, that are oriented toward commercial branding. They are all about promoting a product, a company, or a service; or getting a company’s name, brand, and message out in front of the public as widely as possible. A commercial production company creates videos to grab the public’s attention and interest, and to create excitement-“buzz,” as it’s often called. The company creates what are effectively “teasers” to bring in potential customers.

Commercial producers and their creative teams have to get excited about a client’s product, brand, or message. In this way they develop ideas that connect with the audience. Their process includes personally experiencing what the client is selling to create an understanding of the market and the customer.

The video producer’s job looks creative and exciting, and it can be. It is also a highly demanding and responsible job that calls for not only creativity but people and business skills. The producer might be thought of as a “creative problem-solver.” He or she is the leader of the process from pre-production through actual production to post-production. The producer is responsible for the planning, scheduling, and final editing of the project, and hiring the talent and the staff. He takes part in selecting graphics and audio and may actually write the script. He is the point of contact between the company and the client, facilitating all communications to make sure the project is delivered according to the client’s specifications. And of course, it’s the producer’s job to make sure everything is done on time and on budget.

It is very exacting work that a video production company does. You might not believe the amount of work that goes into a 60-second spot and the number of people it takes to pull it off. But these production companies know how to do it with the greatest effect.

Steinbeck Hitchcock and Yes, Lifeboat

What on earth do Steinbeck and Hitchcock have in common? Well, nothing except that they made a film together called Lifeboat. They did not even share any common interests in terms of their work. John Steinbeck created novels such as Grapes of Wrath which is still considered as a literary masterpiece even by modern critics. The novel was highly controversial at the time it was first published in 1939 due to the anti-capitalist sentiments. But it also won the Pulitzer Prize. This and his work later were instrumental in getting John Steinbeck his maiden Nobel Prize for literature. Steinbeck also wrote some comedies such as Cannery Row and Tortilla Flat but thrillers, not any that I know of.

Alfred Hitchcock lived thrillers and absolutely thrillers. However, he did take some diversions into other genres such as comedies in Mr. and Mrs. Smith and also some nonfiction films just before the Second World War. After the war, he mostly stuck to what he knew best and that was making thriller movies. I don’t know what Steinbeck was thinking about while writing Lifeboat. Was he intentionally making a thriller or just an interracial film with a hypothetical situation about people from various communities of German and allied forces getting together and having to do battle together? I think it’s later and that’s where Steinbeck came into the picture.

Originally the screenplay of Lifeboat was credited to John Steinbeck. But after the film was released Steinbeck requested his name to be removed from the credits because he felt the film had unkind words against organized labor. However, the British and American press at the time thought the film glorified German characters and denigrating the US and British characters. Modern critics see things differently though. Hitchcock defended his characterization because he respected his movie villains. Characterization of a villain has been the hallmark of Hitchcock films over the years. The moral of the story in his opinion was to get the allies together to fight against Nazis.

Lifeboat was nominated for 3 Oscars but received none and it was not commercially very successful either due to the negative publicity and controversies surrounding the film. It was Hitchcock who came up with the idea for the film and considered several top writers at the time for the project including Ernest Hemingway and A J Cronin. Hitchcock didn’t use music in the film as he thought it was imprudent to do so. Where would music come from in the sea? He retorted when asked about it. He was countered with where would the cameras come from in the middle of the sea?

I am a diehard Hitch fan and have seen all his best work and more. I never felt him being racist or unkind to any community unless it is for the characterization. The very fact that he chose Steinbeck for this project confirms this fact for me. But it is a strange combination all the same. After so many years of Hitchcock, it is difficult to associate him with a writer who is not at all a thriller writer. It is a lonesome but great alliance all the same.

How to Become a Successful Distributor in the FMCG Sector

The Fast Moving Consumer Goods or the FMCG sector is a place where goods are sold at a relatively low price and includes products which sell out much quicker than other products. They mostly keep perishable items as opposed to durable items. For example, packaged foods, beverages, toiletries, over-the-counter drugs etc.; whereas durable items include kitchen appliances, textiles, items which can be used for many years. FMCG goods mainly compose of items which have low shelf life. Because it includes items which are required by masses in their daily lifestyle and because this sector has a huge demand, it is essential that this sector divides it work amongst various other short segments. The major segments in the FMCG sector are Manufacturer – Packaging – Sales and Distributorship – Retailer/Wholesaler.

A distributor is someone who will ensure that all your products reach the right people. Whether it is business to business or business to personal. In any emerging market, as demand for a product increases, so does the need for distributors. From everyday use items like cooking oil, packaged foods like biscuits, snacks and everything else with an expiry date, every new trend which comes up as a team of dedicated distributors hard at work to find quality manufacturers and help them bring their product to retail.

Steps to follow to become a Distributor:

Decide what type of distribution business you will run: Distributors can be split into two categories based on who they serve. The first category is, retail distributors buy from wholesalers or manufacturers and sell products directly to consumers. The second Category is, wholesale merchant distributors buy from manufacturers and resell the products to retailers or other distributors. You need to decide which type suits you best and work upon that.

Decide what you would like to distribute: You could focus on a specific product or offer a variety of items. You could base your decisions on a product about which you may feel passionately or any product which you think is not available much in the market. While many large companies are served by equally large distributors, these distributors are unwilling or unable to serve smaller, more specialized business.

Estimate your start-up costs: In addition to a business plan, you will also need some idea of how much money it will take to get your business up and running. As a distributor, your major area of expense will be your inventory. This means that your start-up costs will go parallel as to what product or products you choose to sell. If you are selling a single product then the pricing will depend on how many retailers you are targeting.

Figure out how to sell your products: This will depend largely on who your customers are and what type of products you’re selling. In any case, you have to chalk down specific goals on what methods you can adapt to sell your goods. One of the best ways to do so is to connect more and more with the manufacturers as well as the Retailer/Wholesalers. The more connections you build, the better opportunities you get. This can mean anything from advertising to personal meetings with store owners to search-engine optimization (SEO).

Form your company legally: You’ll have to legally create the company before you can do business. Check with your state regulations and see if you need to create an operating agreement or another type of founding document. Gather any business partners you have for this venture and have them sign any legal documents you fill out

Make your business licensed and registered: You will have to register your business with the correct places or business association as and when required. Your company should be listed in the legal list of companies. Other legal steps may be required to get your business started.

Contact manufacturers or wholesalers of your products: You will need to find sources from which you will buy your product. To locate manufacturers and wholesalers, you will need to build Relationships and connections which will help you to define your work. Networking is the foundation of the distribution industry. You must gain a deep understanding of your target market and clients to develop stronger partnerships. Keep communication open and available.

Purchase inventory: Once you’ve found a source for product, it’s time to place your first order. You’ll need to purchase however much inventory you need. Keeping in mind the budgetary and space constraints you will also need to buy products pertaining to the limit of your users. This is especially true of products with a short shelf-life or FMCG goods. Also, consider the logistics you will require to distribute your goods.

Find a location for your business: The size of the space you need to hold your inventory will be determined by the size of your product and your delivery method. You should consider starting off small as your business builds a reputation. As your business grows, you can move into larger facilities that can accommodate your inventory needs.

Create a website for your business: Creating a customer friendly website is essential in today’s business model. The website should describe prices and product offerings. This is especially important if you sell directly to consumers. You can also invest in search engine optimization (SEO) that directs potential customers directly to your website by placing it higher in search engine results.

Market your product to potential customers. Send out your catalogue to potential customers in your area. The tools of marketing that you can find in today’s digitally marketed world are immense and of huge influence.

Home Sweet Home!

He loves to be at home, almost deliriously. Home… sweet home! Some place where you follow the same delicious routine- everyday, day after day. His mother and sisters hovering around him, giving him mouth-watering meals at the appropriate hours-so religiously maintained! Precious moments at every step of the homely existence, sometimes with his father butting in at the most inappropriate ones! And then… the compulsory evening hours before the television set with family, and a lot of nonsense yet fun. This is heaven, he justifies. Nothing can possibly ever make him think of leaving it!

Of course, he reasons, he is no longer a burden on his father’s measly monthly income. Now, he too has a job-a fairly good job considering the fact that he can carry it on royally residing at home. What’s more-he is contributing to the monthly budget in good measure and as a result of that he is getting even more attention from his mother and more pampering from his beloved sisters, he’s almost sure about that! Yes, he had got several other job offers outside his city, but rejected all in an immaculate cost-benefit analysis that he often indulged in. He will get more salary no doubt, but most of that will go to renting flats, cooking for his own sake, transport costs for homecoming and going and other related costs. Therefore, he is ready to give up that extra income in favour of staying at his heaven.

Sometimes he gets bored too, as is natural. The delicious routine becomes a drag if he decides to think of his apparently purposeless existence. But then he reasons even more vehemently. Why-there is lot of purpose in his life, helping his ageing father, giving solid support to his mother, finding ways and means of marrying off his sisters and so on. Besides, home sweet home always has its never-ending store of pleasures. He can lounge out in the portico sofa by the window with a book or have noisy games of cards, ludo, carom, checkers and the lot with family or can join the guests who come almost every day for gossip or can go for a movie.

His heavenly existence was continuing in full bloom till one fateful day. In fact, for many others it would have been a momentous day of great joy and promise. However, for him it was a D-day. He had to take the decision of his life-a choice between his heaven and a future that he did not put much weight on.

He got an unexpected promotion and transfer to a big city. Maybe thanks to his heavenly roots he had been very good in his office job, and just when the employers wanted to reward him for his efforts all hell broke loose for him. He shared this news with his mother and sisters in a very casual manner, not telling about the exact pay package, but only mentioning the additional unnecessary costs. However, one of his sisters got elated at the prospect of traveling to the megacity and staying in her brother’s home. He looked askance at her.

He is more careful breaking the news to his father. He tries to convince him that this promotion does in no way mean a quick climb-up in the hierarchy; rather he’d wait a little longer and get the promotion at his hometown. Or he’d approach some influential person for a settlement where his dad could also help. And the unnecessary expenses that will come inevitably, his cost-benefit analysis in full flow. He is almost sure that his dad is convinced. Any doting father would want his only son near and around only. However, his father’s next action was not at all expected. His father just walked out of home.

It was only half an hour later, but the suspense made it seem much longer. His father comes in with huge packets on his hands. His father calls upon his mother and places all the packets on the dining table. One by one he opens-sweets, cakes, salty delights and all. He just ushers in a big celebration. His heavenly son just looks on.

“Congratulations, my boy! I was really worried about you and your ways. But you proved to be damn good in work, and the way your company is rewarding you is just terrific. Okay… you’ve gorged on home food and comforts for quite long. Enough of your logic and arguments! Now you get a start on your own. And don’t bother about me. Next time I’m coming to have comforts in your home!”

He tries to look pleadingly at his mother. But she is busy, and merrily setting the table. He must celebrate now.

Chinmay Chakravarty is a professional specialized in the creative field with over two decades of experience in journalistic writing, media co-ordination, film script writing, film dubbing, film & video making, management of international film festivals and editing of books & journals. Proficient in providing professional services in these related fields. Presently working in DD News, India.

Five Things You Are Messing Up in Team Building

There are a number of reasons why nearly every organization encourages teamwork. Research has proven that team building activities offer a good platform for companies to enhance high-impact learning, improve communication, boost employee morale and enhance overall productivity. Workers who embrace teamwork usually benefit by enjoying a sense of satisfaction in functioning a single unit to complete potentially challenging organizational tasks. What’s more, team building gives employees an opportunity to go back to the office with the new skill set and feeling reinvigorated as well.

It is also critical to mention that researchers have proven that having a strong team can potentially result in major gains for both small and established businesses. These long-term gains may include an organization’s ability to maximize profitability by enabling individual employees to better combine their skills to achieve improved results, being able to respond reasonably quickly to rapid structural changes, meeting cross-functional challenges. Team building provides an ideal chance for teams to participate together in a world where each one begins with an equal amount of knowledge about a given task. Equally, team building allows workers to become mission-oriented, a phenomenon that makes them achieve ideal results with minimum resources.

Most organizations will confirm to you that team building is always a daunting task to accomplish. It not only requires an experienced managerial team but dedication, sacrifices, time and energy. Even some of the best companies out there periodically make mistakes when dealing with people. In fact, it is quite common to find companies treating employees like kids and then ask why such workers so frequently fail to fulfil their potentials. What’s more, a significant number of organizations usually invest untold energy and massive resources in actions which ensure workers are unhappy! It is important for organizations to find effective ways of exhausting all the available strengths and abilities of people they employ.

Today in this post, we want to discuss in excruciating details, the five things organizations usually mess up in team building. Read on and enhance your knowledge.

5. Is your organization lacking leadership?

Quite often, discussions about team building revolve around effective communication, sharing a common goal and solving complex business problems. Even though these three factors are absolutely essential, one key factor which is often ignored is leadership! To come up with a strong and successful team, your employees must trust your judgment because this is when they will work efficiently even when you are not available. Of course, this doesn’t imply that you’ll have to be authoritative, instead, focus on fostering trust through humility, transparency, accountability, and honesty. If you didn’t know, it is too easy to dodge responsibility in team settings because you can easily hide in your sea of colleagues. This is where a leader comes in. In organizational settings, true leaders usually take full responsibility for a group’s final results. This means that the leader will be highly motivated to keep members accountable for their every action.

4. Neglecting your workers’ input.

This is a huge mistake a number of organizations do. Apparently, firms must connect team building with critical business drivers. Equally, you must set clear and achievable goals. However, organizations must understand that teams consist of human beings who have personal and different development needs which when fulfilled can potentially enhance the overall efficiency. Research has shown that focusing on the individual needs of a team strengthens your organization as a unit. On the other hand, putting much emphasis on the objectives of your business will only lead to short-lived benefits but does not foster sustainable development due to ineffective teamwork.

3. Unrealistic organizational objectives.

To create a strong and focused team, you must first set clear goals and share with them your objectives. Explain to your team members what you expect of them. Many businesses usually fail to set realistic goals thus leaving employees figuring out the likely outcomes. Set your goals according to your potential. Carry out an analysis of your available resources, assess the ability of your staff and set clear and achievable goals. To create a functional and reliable team, you must set clear goals and inform your employees about those goals. When every worker knows what is expected of her/him, teamwork becomes a success!

2. Failing to seek the opinions of your employees.

The key to team building is to understand and embrace this term: None of us is as smart as all of us’. Teams enable individuals to achieve things far much beyond every member’s individual potential. Bring every team member on board by asking for their ideas, opinions and suggestions. Equally, you should be able to implement those continuous improvement suggestions and empower them as well. Finally, you must provide relevant feedbacks regarding whether those ideas were implemented or rejected. Always make decisions after asking your team members for their input.

1. Failing to celebrate successes while acknowledging failures.

Recognizing and celebrating your business successes and milestones not only brings your team together but allows your employees to realize that people can achieve great things by working as a team. Learn to congratulate a team member who does something extraordinary. This helps members to feel visible and loved and acknowledge that their contribution is appreciated. On the other hand, if your team fails, come together and direct your thoughts and efforts at solving the problem. Remain positive and never turn your team discussion into a blame game. If you want your team building journey to become successful, you must avoid these five things at all cost.